Diabetes

Sep 24, 2021

About

Diabetes is a number of diseases that involve problems with the hormone insulin. Normally, the pancreas (an organ behind the stomach) releases insulin to help your body store and use the sugar and fat from the food you eat. Diabetes can occur when the pancreas produces very little or no insulin, or when the body does not respond appropriately to insulin. As yet, there is no cure. People with diabetes need to manage their disease to stay healthy.

There are a few different types of diabetes:
  • Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. The immune system attacks and destroys cells in the pancreas, where insulin is made. It’s unclear what causes this attack. About 10 percent of people with diabetes have this type.
  • Type 2 diabetes occurs when your body becomes resistant to insulin, and sugar builds up in your blood.
  • Prediabetes occurs when your blood sugar is higher than normal, but it’s not high enough for a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes.
  • Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar during pregnancy. Insulin-blocking hormones produced by the placenta cause this type of diabetes.

Correlation Heatmap

Pairplot of all vaiables to diabetes Outcome

Pairplot among all vaiables of diabetes

Swarm Catplot of Preganancies and Glucose to Outcome

Box Catplot of Preganancies and Glucose to Outcome

Comparing the Insulin, Glucose, Blood Pressue and Pregnancies in Diabetes Patients

Comparing the Insulin, Glucose, Blood Pressue and Pregnancies in Non Diabetes Patients

Parallel Categorical Comparision of Blood Pressure, Glucose and Pregnancies to diabetes outcome

Parallel Categorical Comparision of Blood Pressure and Pregnancies to diabetes outcome

Scatter plot comparing patients blood pressure, glucose, BMI and skin thickness in diabetic and non diabetic patients age wise

Scatter plot comparing patients blood pressure, glucose, BMI and skin thickness in diabetic and non diabetic patients with BMI

Box Plot of Glucose and Pregnancies

Box Plot of BMI and Pregnancies

Conculsion

Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs because the body is unable to use blood sugar (glucose) properly. The exact cause of this malfunction is unknown, but genetic and environmental factors play a part. Risk factors for diabetes include obesity and high levels of cholesterol. After Analysis these are top causes of diabetes:

Insulin

  • Lack of insulin production This is primarily the cause of type 1 diabetes. It occurs when insulin-producing cells are damaged or destroyed and stop producing insulin. Insulin is needed to move blood sugar into cells throughout the body. The resulting insulin deficiency leaves too much sugar in the blood and not enough in the cells for energy.
  • Insulin resistance This is specific to type 2 diabetes. It occurs when insulin is produced normally in the pancreas, but the body is still unable move glucose into the cells for fuel. At first, the pancreas will create more insulin to overcome the body’s resistance. Eventually the cells “wear out.” At that point the body slows insulin production, leaving too much glucose in the blood. This is known as prediabetes. A person with prediabetes has a blood sugar level higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. Unless tested, the person may not be aware, as there are no clear symptoms. Type 2 diabetes occurs as insulin production continues to decrease and resistance increases.

    Age

  • Risk of developing type 2 diabetes increases as you age. Your risk goes up after age 45 in particular. However, the incidence of type 2 diabetes is increasing dramatically among children, adolescents, and younger adults. Likely factors include reduced exercise, decreased muscle mass, and weight gain as you age. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed by the age of 30.

    BMI(Body Mass Index)

  • Obesity Excess body fat can cause insulin resistance. Fatty tissue may cause inflammation that can lead to insulin resistance. But many overweight people never develop diabetes, and more research is needed on the link between obesity and diabetes.
  • Poor diet Poor nutrition may contribute to type 2 diabetes. A diet high in calories, fat, and cholesterol increases your body’s resistance to insulin.
  • Lack of exercise Exercise makes muscle tissue respond better to insulin. This is why regular aerobic exercise and resistance training can lower your diabetes risk. Talk to your doctor about an exercise plan that is safe for you.